Tag Archives: Sir Clive Loader

Leicestershire police support biggest ever survey to uncover true impact of policing and crime in rural areas

ruralpoliceThe largest ever survey into crime and anti-social Behaviour (ASB) in rural areas has been launched in England, Wales and Northern Ireland to find out how the police can better serve rural communities.

Supported by Leicestershire Police and the Police and Crime Commissioner Sir Clive Loader, the survey has been launched by the National Rural Crime Network (NRCN).

The survey is calling for people from Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland and across the country, who work or live in rural areas to come forward and give their views on policing in their community, the impact crime and ASB has on them and their neighbours and to ultimately help shape the future of crime prevention and rural policing.

Anyone living or working in rural areas is being encouraged to take part in the survey to help build a picture of what is a widespread but often misunderstood issue.

You don’t need to have been a victim of crime to have a view on how the police work. You may be concerned about police visibility or response, see incidents that go unreported, or you may have a local officer who is engaged and proactive.

Against a backdrop of policing budget reductions and a growing focus on higher crime areas, the new survey will assess how crime and ASB, as well as the threat of potential crime, affects individuals, both financially and emotionally.

It will also shed light on the human implications of crime and the fear of crime seeking to explore the impact not just on individual victims, but also communities as a whole.

Any crime that happens in an urban area can, and does, happen in rural areas too, and how policing is delivered affects everyone living and working there.

Traditional farm-related incidents such as fuel theft and sheep rustling make up just one part of the problem; we need to understand all the other issues that affect people in our remoter areas, as well as in market towns, villages and the countryside more generally.

Chair of the NRCN, Julia Mulligan, who is also North Yorkshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner, commented:

“The full scale of crime in rural areas has never before been assessed. Whilst official figures show rural

Julia Mulligan
Julia Mulligan: …survey aims to build a clear picture

crime, like crime in general, is decreasing, we are concerned about the wider implications on people and communities. The fear of crime can be as detrimental to people’s wellbeing as crimes themselves, so we are keen to find out more through this survey.

“Our aim is to build a clear picture of the issue to shape future delivery of services locally and nationally. By completing the survey, people can really have their say on how crime affects them and what they expect from local police and their partners involved in community safety.”

The survey, which is taking place with support from the Home Office, aims to build a body of information to improve national awareness of crime in rural areas as well as provide a clearer picture of attitudes towards crime to help inform government and local policy.

The findings will be important to ensure the human costs such as psychological impacts of crime are taken into account and police funding is spent where it is most needed, rather than simply being channelled to urban conurbations. The ultimate aim is to make rural communities safer.

While the survey will aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the scale and financial cost of crime and anti-social behaviour, it will also measure the emotional impact of crime in rural areas by asking how incidents made victims feel and the longer term effects on confidence and security.

Mulligan continued:

“While average crime rates do tend to be higher in urban areas, tackling rural crime comes with its own specific challenges whether that be the ability of police forces to respond quickly or the scale of crimes which may go unreported. This survey is an important step towards delivering a better service to communities and making the countryside a safer place to live and work.”

Established in July 2014, NRCN includes a wide range of organisations with an interest in community safety and rural affairs such as the National Farmers Union, Historic England, Neighbourhood Watch and Crimestoppers.

The survey will be open until Wednesday 24 June.

To complete the survey, visit http://www.nationalruralcrimenetwork.net/survey?member=Leicestershire

For more information on the NRCN visit: www.nationalruralcrimenetwork.net

Lubbesthorpe New Town – another twist in the tale!

Sir Clive Loader the Leicestershire Police & Crime Commissioner has called for a judicial review of developer contributions towards the policing of the new town of Lubbesthorpe – the possible consequence of his actions is that Lubbesthorpe may not proceed !!

[Reprinted from Lfe Rag Facebook post]

The PCC challenges:

1. The terms of the S106 (developer contributions towards infrastructure etc) are illogical and irrational in that they fail to provide funding to meet the policing needs arising from the development

2. The process followed by Blaby DC was defective with insufficient reasoning given for their decisions

3. Blaby DC have failed to honour expectations of securing police funding in an appropriate manner or provide reasonable explanation as to why it failed to do so

Sir Clive Loader
Sir Clive Loader

The RAG have long argued that a development of the Lubbeshorpe land is inappropriate in the scale proposed given the effect it will have on local communities and the massive amount of infrastructure required to try and justify the development.

1000 acres of prime agricultural land, locked on three sides by two motorways (M1 and M69) and one of Leicesters main arterial roads (A47) as well as bordering the busy settlements of Leicester Forest East and Enderby and was always foolhardy at best.

Blaby DC have for too many years been approaching their housing problem from the wrong angle, you cant start with one piece of land, create one large housing need and assume you can make both fit each other…. smaller developments and brown field sites are the appropriate way forward or at worse you identify land where appropriate infrastucture already exists or could be readily supplied – Lubbesthorpe never did and never will be an appropriate development.

This development will cause major problems to Leicestershire residents for miles around and will create further traffic problems around Fosse Park as well as traffic issues and air, noise and light pollution issues in Thorpe Astley as well as Enderby and Leicester Forest East

Report cover

Sir Clive Loader launches refreshed policing vision

Report cover
The refreshed Police and Crime Plan from the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner


Thursday October 31, 2013 marked the launch of Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) Sir Clive Loader’s revised Police and Crime Plan for the period 2013 to 2017.

The Plan has been shaped by the views of the public. The front cover carries the strap-line “Putting you at the heart of policing, your voice in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland.

Known as ‘The Plan’ by rank and file officers within Leicestershire Police, the 44-page document sets out Sir Clive’s expectations for local police and partners to achieve positive outcomes in 18 areas.

Targets include:
A reduction of 10 to 17-year-old young people entering the criminal justice system for the first time and a 5% reduction in total crime by March 2014.

Sir Clive said:

“The Plan lays out my vision for the future of policing, based on the views of the public and my findings during my first year in office.

This revised plan sets out how policing will be made more effective, more efficient, and better suited to meeting the needs of all.”

 

The previous plan’s six themes have become four.

The themes to Supporting victims and witnesses and to Protecting the vulnerable now incorporate the previous plan’s Reducing crime and Mental health themes respectively.

These changes reflect how the previous plan’s outcomes relating to the Reducing crime and Mental health themes have become integrated into everyday policing business.

The revised themes of the plan are:

• Reducing offending and re-offending;
• Supporting victims and witnesses;
• Making communities and neighbourhoods safer; and
• Protecting the vulnerable.

The targets within the Police and Crime Plan are set by Sir Clive Loader, who in turn holds the Chief Constable of Leicestershire Police to account for their delivery.

Sir Clive added:

“I fully recognise that the police in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland do a very good job of keeping our communities safe. However, it is important not to become complacent. In this plan, I have set clear priorities for the Chief Constable according to your expectations and demands.

“My plan is by no means final. There will be further revisions as the landscape changes in funding, crime patterns, and national policing obligations.”

The Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner for Leicestershire has made the Police and Crime Plan available to the public on its website in original full text, executive summary, and Easy Read versions. The webpage also displays a video introduction [visit http://youtu.be/w3yfn_Qnt_Q] to the Plan complete with British Sign Language interpretation by Action Deafness. The video is also available to view here on Enderby EYE

To access the Plan, go tohttp://ow.ly/qld74 or visit www.leics.pcc.police.uk and seek the Police and Crime Plan tab.

Sir Clive concluded:

“During the election, I said I would be a PCC for all. I stand true to that statement. I will listen, decide, and then act in an open and even-handed manner. I welcome your contributions, many of which have already informed the content of this document.”

For more information about PCC Sir Clive Loader and the OPCC, or to become involved in shaping the vision for policing in your area, please visit the OPCC Website www.leics.pcc.police.uk

If you have any information about crime and anti-social behaviour in your area please contact your local police on 101 or call Crimestoppers, which is free and anonymous, on 0800 555 111.